History

Captain Howard Stansbury

In 1849, Captain Howard Stansbury was sent out to make an exploration and survey of the Great Salt Lake. The initial point of his expedition was Fort Leavenworth. He left the fort on the 31st of May, 1849, with eighteen men, five wagons, and forty-six horses and mules. A Mr. Sackett joined the party. He had one wagon, one carriage, and fifteen “animals.” There were five persons with Mr. Sackett, possibly his family. Lieutenant Gunnison being ill, was put on a bed in the spring wagon used to transport the instruments. Captain Stansbury followed what he terms the Emigration Road, …

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The Cabavans

The town of Franklin, in Howard County, Missouri, was opposite the present City of Boonville. In 1828, the entire site of the town was washed into the Missouri River. It was the cradle of the Santa Fe trade, and for some years it was the eastern terminus of the Santa Fe Trail. As population spread to the westward other towns were established along the Missouri River and the headquarters of the trade followed the population. When the Trail was surveyed, in 1825, Fort Osage, on the Missouri, at Sibley, was made the starting-point. Independence, Missouri, was laid out in 1827, …

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J. V. Brower

It is necessary to notice here the work of one J. V. Brower, who some years ago came into Kansas and pretended to fix beyond question the exact spots visited by Coronado. He published three books on the transactions of Coronado. He made maps of Quivira and the adjacent country of Harahey. On these maps he pretended to define the bounds of those countries exactly—there was no conjecture, no possibility of error admitted. In instances without number the lines of Quivira bend around the heads of ravines as though a careful survey had been made. The north line is carried …

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Bourgmont Expedition

The French were ever seeking to develop trade with the Indians, and when commercial relations were established they were fostered and closely guarded. As early as 1718, Sieur Presle, now supposed to have been a stockholder in the Company of the Indies, had suggested that Etienne Venyard Sieur de Bourgmont be sent to arrange trade relations with the Missouris, living at that time near the mouth of the Grand River, and possibly on that stream in the present bounds of Livingston or Carroll counties, in Missouri. To insure the stability and permanency of the trade so arranged, Bourgmont established Fort …

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Bibliography of the Oregon Trail

The best authorities on the subject of the Oregon Trail are the publications of the Government. It is not possible to set out here all those consulted in the preparation of this chapter—space will not permit it. Explorations and Surveys for a Railroad Route from the Mississippi River to the Pacific Ocean—War Department. Twelve volumes issued by the Government, 1859. There are many valuable maps in this series. Also much about the early explorations. History of Utah. Four volumes. Orson F. Whitney. Salt Lake City, 1892. Some things of value found in no other work. History of American Fur Trade …

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Bibliography for the Spanish Explorations

The principal authorities on the Spanish explorations of Kansas are: George Parker Winship, in The 14th Annual Report of the Bureau of Ethnology, 1896. Hubert Howe Bancroft in the History of Arizona and New Mexico, 1889. Spanish Explorations in the Southern United States, edited by Frederick W. Hodge, 1907. Spanish Explorations in the Southwest, edited by Herbert Eugene Bolton, 1916. “The True Route of Coronado’s March,” by F. S. Dellenbaugh, in Bulletin of American Geographical Society, Vol. XXIX, No. 4, 1897. The works of A. F. Bandelier. Among these, see Historical Introduction to Studies Among the Sedentary Indians of New …

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Bent’s Fort, Kansas History

One of the most important stations on the Santa Fe Trail, as originally located, was Bent’s Fort. It was situated on the Arkansas River in what is now Bent County, Colorado. It is deemed necessary to give some account of it because of the fact that it was the largest post on the trail and exerted a considerable influence on the trade of the Plains. In some form and in different locations it persisted until a very late day. Silas Bent was born in Massachusetts, in 1744, and it is said that he was one of the party who threw …

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Argonauts and the Oregon Trail

The discovery of gold in California very nearly upset the world. No event of a like nature ever created such excitement. From every state parties and individuals set out for the gold fields on the other side of North America. Very nearly every man in Missouri who could do so started to California in 1849. Many of the companies were led by the men who had served under Colonel Doniphan in the War with Mexico. These gold hunters passed over all the branches of the Oregon Trail. Many thousands of them came up the branch which crossed at Topeka or …

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Treaty with the Great and Little Osage, 1825

Whereas the Congress of the United States of America, being anxious to promote and direct commercial and friendly intercourse between the citizens of the United States and those of the Mexican Republic, and, to afford protection to the same, did, at their last session, pass an act, which was approved the 3d March, 1825, “To authorize the President of the United States to cause a road to be marked out from the Western frontier of Missouri to the confines of New Mexico,” and which authorizes the President of the United States to appoint Commissioners to carry said act of Congress …

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Albert Sidney Johnston

Of the military expeditions over the Oregon Trail, only that of Albert Sidney Johnston will be mentioned in this work. After the establishment of Fort Laramie there were many military tours to the westward from Fort Leavenworth. In 1857 there was an uprising in Utah known as the Mormon Rebellion, and the United States sent out a military force to put it down. This force was commanded by Colonel Albert Sidney Johnston. Colonel E. V. Sumner had been assigned to this command, but the troubles in Kansas demanded that some officer be put in charge of the troops the Border-Ruffians …

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